EC 2000 Workshop:  Teaching "a–k" Skills
 

Objectives

Participants will be able to discuss
  • Why engineering faculty should be interested in teaching "a–k" skills
  • What it means to teach "a–k" skills
  • Where and when programs should teach "a–k" skills
  • Who should teach "a–k" skills
  • How engineering faculty should teach "a–k" skills
Participant Background
  • Familiarity with ABET EC 2000 Criteria 2 and 3
Topics
  • The skills defined in EC 2000 and the impact on engineering curriculum
  • Approaches for teaching skills in engineering programs
Agenda
  • EC 2000 and the "a–k" skills
  • Teaching "a–k" skills in engineering programs
  • Methodology for teaching "a–k" skills
  • Samples modules for teaching "a–k" skills

 

Russ Pimmel is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alabama. He teaches digital systems and computer hardware courses and the senior capstone design course. In recent years he has pursued a long-term interest in teaching methodologies. He has worked with his faculty colleagues to explore teaching improvements through a program that includes a weekly colloquium, periodic faculty workshops, and an outside speaker program.

For further information
Whether you're just getting started or looking for ideas, the Foundation Coalition would like to help you explore alternative approaches to learning and teaching through workshops, Web sites, lesson plans, and reading materials. For suggestions on where to start, see our Web site at http://www.foundationcoalition.org or contact Jeffrey Froyd at froyd@ee.tamu.edu or 979.845.7574.